29 Jun

Swarovski binoculars are known worldwide as being some of the brightest and highest quality glasses available at any price. These world class instruments are used by birdwatchers and hunters who demand the very best money can buy and will accept only the best quality currently available. Swarovski glass is world class and compares to anything ever made. Sometimes perfection comes in small packages, and the Swarovski 8×20 pocket binoculars fit into this category. Not only do they fit into the category, but they also fit into shirt pockets. They have a double hinge design that folds into one of the smallest packages you have ever seen. For a tiny, light unit that you might not even remember you’re carrying, the field of view and the big bright picture will take you by surprise. They are so clear and user friendly that you can actually compare them to many full size binoculars and not be found wanting. They are perfect for covert operations due to their minuscule size, and the glasses you will use the most are the ones you have with you. It’s not hard to always have this Swarovski binocular with you.…

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27 Jun

I called a well-known quality manufacturer to confirm dimensions of some riflescope rings labeled as Picatinny. I asked the technical expert there for some insight and he thought I was some quack because Picatinny and Weaver rifle scope rings were exactly the same. They are absolutely not the same. It’s typical that a so called “expert” didn’t know the difference. The recoil lugs on true Picatinny scope rings are much larger than Weaver style rifle scope rings to better fit the dimensions of MIL-STD-1913 (Picatinny) rails. The recoil groove on Picatinny rails is .206. Not plus or minus, but .206 if the manufacturing was done correctly. Weaver base recoil slots are plus or minus .180, again, depending on the manufacturer, and with a certain amount of leeway. So, Weaver scope rings will fit on Picatinny bases, but Picatinny rifle scope rings will not fit on Weaver rails. That’s how it’s supposed to work. Unfortunately, manufacturers and consumers interchange the monikers, occasionally resulting in non-compatible components.
For instance, Leupold recently changed their superb Mark 4 rifle scope rings to fit Weaver bases, so they are no longer true Picatinny due to the reduced size of the recoil lugs under the …

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25 Jun

The Glock Entrenching tool has been around for years. I got mine in the early nineties and it has saved my butt a couple times. Once on an early morning bowhunt I parked my car just inside a fence in a cornfield. Cold morning. Ground was frozen solid with a covering of ice and frost. I stayed in my tree until early afternoon. By that time the sun had melted the ice under my tires until my car had sunk several inches. Damn Camaro with no traction, too. By the time I dug out all four wheels and stuffed corn stalks in the mud for traction I looked like a coal miner, I was so black. Finally got the car out thanks to my Glock Entrenching tool. It has a hardened, fairly sharpened blade with a polymer telescoping handle. A root saw is in the handle and may be used separately or with the shovel. This saw helped me cut down the corn stalks easily.

Another time the tool got me out of the snow, saving me again from the tow truck monsters.

We should all keep a Glock Entrenching tool in our vehicles.…

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22 Jun

The single best way to increase shooting skill is to shoot. Most of us don’t have the luxury of opening our back door and shooting into the back forty to get a bit of trigger time or to sight in a gun or study our latest handloads. But an airgun or a .22 still keeps you honed to a certain degree. Breathing, position shooting, trigger control, etcetera, can not really be practiced by any other way than shooting. Dry firing is good but boring, and it doesn’t put holes in paper or anything else. Your local indoor firing range may be the best place to go.

Older eyes pretty much require some kind of optics for small targets, magnified or not, and questions arise about what kind, how much to spend, and so on. For a small amount of money you may purchase a Simmons Universal red dot sight and easily install and remove it from a variety of firearms. The Universal part comes in play with a removeable 7/8″ Weaver style clamp that is simply turned upside down to create a 3/8″ tip-off size adapter for most 22s. What else is nice is that a non-magnified red dot sight …

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20 Jun

The Trijicon night sights are recommended to be installed by a gunsmith with appropriate tools such as a sight pusher. These tools gently remove sights from their dovetails and install the new press-fit sights with ease without marring the finish or breaking the radioactive vials of tritium. That being said, installation can certainly be done by the home tinkerer with the judicious use of a nylon, brass, or wooden drift and a hammer. Keep in mind that dovetails and sights are not always exactly the same. Some dovetails vary by a few thousandths of an inch and the Trijicon night sights may or may not require a swipe or two of a stone. Be careful. Metal is easily removed but impossible to put back. I’ve installed scores of sights and haven’t broken one yet. Bring your tools to the range for final sight in.…

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19 Jun

bushnell…

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18 Jun

The Streamlight TLR1 and pistols go together like tacos and Tabasco. Just make sure to order the correct light. The recoil lugs on the light have to match the application. The 1913 recoil lug is wider than the other versions and is made for Picatinny rails only. Many pistols don’t accept this width and will use the Glock model instead. The S&W key is for third generation Smith pistols and not for the new M&P series which has standard 1913 rails. The same holds true regarding the TLR2 series of lights with lasers. We sell a lot of these Streamlight offerings and I recommend them highly.…

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14 Jun

The Bushnell Elite 10×40 riflescope is one of the best fixed 10x scopes available, and its reasonable price of a bit over $200.00 makes it available to everyone. The scope tracks well, and all 3200s are tested with the equivalent of .375 H&H recoil. Bushnell also has a “no questions asked” warranty. If you’re not convinced that it’s the best scope you’ve every used, Bushnell will replace it or give you a full refund. Simple. A lot of Barretts have these mounted on them, and they hold up fine.…

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13 Jun

Trijicon night sights for the S&W M&P Pistol have just been announced as nearly available. This super popular pistol has shown up everywhere in the last handful of months and I’ve been getting queries on the availability of night sights for it for nearly as long. The order number will be SA37 and our website will show these orderable shortly.…

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11 Jun

I used an inexpensive Meade Condor spotting scope for viewing 100 yard groups yesterday. It worked just fine. The glass was plenty clear and all bullet holes were easily seen. You don’t have to spend a lot of money for optics that let you see where your shots went at 100 yards. Keep in mind that lower power is easier to use than high in most cases because of mirage and steadiness. I used it mostly in the middle of its 20-60 power range. It was an extra scope I picked up so a guest had something to use when I was using my main spotter. The aluminum case and soft case were nice extras, and the tripod functioned as needed. All told, a good value in a scope for this application.…

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